Reading material

It’s December again — how did that happen? Once the dust had settled after Thanksgiving, I pulled out the Christmas ornaments and the artificial tree (“Next year, let’s have a real tree!” said Baki). I can’t help but stop and take stock all that’s happened over the past year. This time last year, we were agonising over changing Baki’s school and the horrible ordeal of moving house. All happily buried in the past now!

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My mother made sure I had advent calendars every year and I loved them. Mine were the old school open-a-door-and-coo-at-the-picture kind, but of course advent calendars have progressed a bit since then. Baki is a great fan of the Lego advent calendars, but I thought we’d try something new this year, so I gathered 24 books for him and he’s having a book a day. Of course, this means that Kaya has to have a book a day as well, since he wants to be like his big brother in every way. Don’t tell him that some of his are actually some of my old books wrapped up!

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Speaking of reading material, I want to thank Our Growing Paynes for nominating this blog for the 3 Stars Blogger of the Year award. I’ve never gotten an award before, so although it sounded a bit daunting to participate I thought it would be churlish not to. I would like to nominate two blogs that I only found recently and have been enjoying. They are:

Women Living Life After 50 — I love reading Sue’s posts about her daily life, but she recently wrote a really wonderful piece about dealing with grief during the holiday season that I thought was great. I always find that the holidays make me reflect upon loved ones who are no longer with us, and the list only gets longer.

Janey in Mersin — This is an interesting blog written by an Australian woman living in Mersin, a town that is also on the Mediterranean coast of Turkey, but farther east. She writes with humor about the ups and downs of finding her feet in a new place.

The instructions for this award are simple:
1 Select the blog(s) you think deserve the ‘Blog of the Year 2013’ Award
2 Write a blog post and tell us about the blog(s) you have chosen – there are no minimum or maximum number of blogs required – and ‘present’ the blog(s) with their award.
3 Let the blog(s) that you have chosen know that you have given them this award and share the instructions with them – (please don’t alter the instructions or the badges!)
4 Come over and say hello to the originator of the ‘Blog of the Year 2013’ Award via this link – http://thethoughtpalette.co.uk/blog-awards-2/blog-of-the-year-2013-award/
5 You can now also join the ‘Blog of the Year’ Award Facebook page – click the link here https://www.facebook.com/groups/BlogoftheYear/ and share your blog posts with an even wider audience.
6 And as a winner of the award – please add a link back to the blog that presented you with the award – and then proudly display the award on your blog … and start collecting stars…

I hope everyone else is getting off to a roaring start this December as well!

In My Kitchen, December 2012

Signs of the season — a two-kitchen edition!

In My Kitchen is a neat series that started out at Fig Jam and Lime Cordial. To find more, go to the mother lode.

In my kitchen this month, there are signs of the season.

1. Solidified olive oil in the A.M.

olive oil

 

When I went out to the kitchen in the garden to make breakfast, I discovered that the olive oil had solidified. (Those are both olive oil; the one on the right is extra virgin.) This is always a sure sign of winter; apparently it happens at about 40F, so you can see that we are not talking about arctic winter here. Conversely, I have a bottle of coconut oil in the kitchen as well, and when that goes all liquidy I know it’s really hot out.

2. A duck on a hook

duck

This year, we are making a Peking duck for Christmas dinner. We have been hanging it out to dry for a few days now. I am sitting in the city kitchen and it is in the oven as I type this, popping away in the oven and turning a very deep and seductive shade of mahogany. It does need to dry out thoroughly, though, so we took it out to the garden with us.

3. A Christmas cake

cake

My father loved Christmas cake and always insisted that we coat it in marzipan, cover it in royal icing and then stud it with silver balls. I am not sure why he loved those silver balls so much  because they are not even that nice to eat (I can totally understand the marzipan bit, though). But after all these years, a Christmas cake just wouldn’t seem right without them. We added Darth Maul afterwards:

darth maul

4. An angel

glass angel

My mom got this angel from a glass blower in her neighborhood, back when her neighborhood was Cihangir, Istanbul. She was new to me this year, and has witnessed a lot of baking and other kitchen madness. I’ll miss having her up when all the ornaments are packed away until next year.

So that’s what’s in my kitchen this month. Merry Christmas, everyone!

 

A tree of my own

This year I have my own tree for the very first time. In the past, I’ve spent Christmas under other people’s trees — my parents’ or my cousin Elaine’s, or I’ve been abroad on my own somewhere and improvised. I feel a bit ambivalent about having bought a fake tree, but there it is. I was going to try and find a cedar tree that we could plant in the garden afterwards, but time was running short — Baki had a cookie decorating party today, and I thought we ought to have a tree up for it. (And now that the party is over, I have this wonderful, light and liberated feeling. I feel exhilarated by parties in the same way that I am by running. That is to say, I rejoice when the deed is done.)

I stayed up late one night last week to unpack Fake Tree and straighten out all the branches. Then I wound a string of lights around the center of the tree, since that’s what my cousin Bill always says to do (I might not seem to be paying attention, but I am).  Now, I might not have had a tree, but that doesn’t mean I don’t have any decorations. My Auntie Ga used to send me an ornament for Christmas every year. This is the first one I ever got from her:

nut

Then, after she died my cousin Elaine sort of picked up where she left off, and this is one from her:

mirror

Then there are a few other oldies, like my old Tusker earring, made out of a bottlecap from Kenya’s fine lager:

tusker

And an opulent, gold leafed egg that I am always amazed has made it through another year:

egg

And an ornament that is especially precious this year for having a message in Uncle Herbie’s precise hand:

heart

At the end of the night, the tree had all of my old ornaments on it and I thought it looked pretty good:

tree before

But this is also the year that I was reunited with all of the ornaments that I grew up with, and the following day while Baki was at school, my mother and I put them up, including Auntie Ga’s snowflakes:

snowflake

And our Roman angel, which my mother just told me she got at the Vatican, so I guess it deserves its lofty perch.

ange;l

And we added a new ornament this year, as well; Baki chose this one in Abu Dhabi:

abu dhabi

So that in the end, the tree looked like this (and seemed to me quite unashamed of not being real):

tree after

I hope you will forgive me if I am stating the obvious, but this is the first time I have done this. And it seemed somehow significant that these little symbols of my past had been united for the first time. I was struck by how some ornaments’ significance has changed with the death of loved ones, and was happy to be adding a new memory to the collection. It makes me wonder how the boys will react to these ornaments in years to come, and if they might one day be decorating trees of their own.

At the moment, it seems the furthest thing from their minds.

bye